UPDATE: At Least 149 Dead After Powerful Mexico Earthquake

A powerful earthquake rocked Mexico on Tuesday, killing at least 149 people and toppling buildings – less than two weeks after a magnitude-8.1 quake hit the country and left nearly 100 dead.

Death toll is expected to rise after a 7.1 magnitude earthquake strikes 120km from Mexico City, collapsing buildings and killing more than 139 people. There are varying reports that children have been killed after part of an elementary school in Mexico City collapsed.

Rescue efforts are underway to free children trapped in the rubble at the Enrique Rebsamen school. According to reports some have already been rescued but others are still missing. I’ll bring you more details when I can confirm it.

From a on the scene report:  “Other people have formed human chains and are passing big blocks of rubble down the line, trying to get that away. On street corners around the area, there are collections of food and water and first aid supplies already building up. Unfortunately it doesn’t seem like they’ve found any survivors yet in this particular building that I’ve been next to. There are still army troops and first aiders climbing all around the debris. And every so often, they’ll call for absolute silence from all the volunteers around in the hope that they can hear any call from survivors trapped inside.”

Itzel Hernandez Galvan, 21, was in her car, about to head home from her job at a marketing firm, when she heard people screaming and realized that part of the building was about to collapse onto her car. She opened the door and ran as half of the building broke off, crushing her car and taking out trees and power lines.

“I ran and I survived,” she said, still covered in dust. Others weren’t so lucky. Several people were buried alive, she said.

Rescue workers managed to pull at least eight survivors from the rubble, but Galvan said she saw a child was dead.

Today marks the anniversary of the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, which killed over 5,000 people and was the most destructive in the city’s history. The sequence of events included a foreshock of magnitude 5.2 that occurred the prior May, the main-shock on September 19, and two large aftershocks.

The first of these occurred on 20 September with a magnitude of 7.5 and the second occurred seven months later on 30 April 1986 with a magnitude of 7.0. They were located off the coast along the Middle America Trench, more than 350 kilometers (220 miles) away, but the city suffered major damage due to its large magnitude and the ancient lake bed that Mexico City sits on. The event caused between three and four billion USD in damage as 412 buildings collapsed and another 3,124 were seriously damaged in the city.

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Be a part of Science Of Cycles Multi-Disaster Relief Initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.   Cheers, Mitch

 

 

BREAKING NEWS: Large 7.1 Earthquake Hits Mexico

A powerful earthquake jolted Mexico City on Tuesday, causing buildings to sway sickeningly on the anniversary of a 1985 quake that did major damage to the capital.

The extent of damage and injuries was not immediately clear, but people fled office buildings along the central Reforma Avenue.

Mexico’s seismological agency calculated its preliminary magnitude at 6.8 and said its center was east of the city in the state of Puebla. The U.S. Geological Survey set the magnitude at 7.1.

Pictures fell from walls and objects were shaken off of flat surfaces. Some people dove for cover under desks.

Earlier in the day buildings across the city held preparation drills on the anniversary of the 1985 quake.

BREAKING NEWS: Massive 8.2 Magnitude Quake Hits Off Coast of Southern Mexico

A massive 8.2 magnitude earthquake hit off the coast of southern Mexico late Thursday night, causing buildings to sway violently and people to flee into the streets in panic as far away as the capital city. The USGS reports their instruments measured slightly lower at 8.0 magnitude.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center registered the quake as measuring 8.2 magnitude at its epicenter located 165 kilometers (102 miles) west of Tapachula in southern Chiapas state not far from Guatemala. It had a depth of 35 kilometers (22 miles).

The PTWC  reports tsunami waves have been observed. Based on all current data received, hazardous tsunami waves are forecast for local and regional coastal areas. Tsunami waves are reaching heights more than 3 meters high (9.8 feet).

The U.S. Tsunami Warning System said hazardous tsunami waves were possible on the Pacific coasts of several Central American countries. Waves were possible within the next three hours for Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Honduras and Ecuador, it said. There was no tsunami threat for the U.S. West Coast.

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 Civil protection officials were checking for damage in Chiapas, but the quake was so powerful that frightened residents in Mexico City more than 1,000 kilometers (650 miles) away fled apartment buildings, often in their pajamas, and gathered in groups in the street.

Around midnight buildings swayed strongly for more than minute, loosening light fixtures from ceilings. Helicopters crisscrossed the sky above Mexico City with spotlights. Some neighborhoods kept electricity while others remained in darkness.

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Science Of Cycles Hurricane Relief Initiative

Be a part of Science Of Cycles hurricane relief initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.   Cheers, Mitch

 

 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Time to Evaluate 2017 Solar Eclipse Prediction

First, let me say the reason you have not received updated articles over the last 8 or 9 days is that I was called in by the Emergency Management Office to help with Harvey.

Most of you already know I began my training back in 1995 with the Red Cross, and then in 1996 I switched to Emergency Management and trained to become a trainer. Anyway, I say this to let you know where I have been. Later I requested to be put on reserves, and eventually retired from services. But Harvey was a nasty one and they needed everyone they could get.

Now here comes ‘Irma’ registered as a Cat. 5 with 170-180 mph winds. It has now hit north of the Dominican Republic earlier today and appears to be heading towards south Florida. “Irma” has now claimed 13 lives and is directed toward the islands of Turks and Caicos. If Irma continues along this path, it will reach the Bahamas Friday morning.

I think it important to present a verbal visual to what a category 5 hurricane is and can do:

Cat. 5 – Sustained Winds – 157 mph or higher (252 km/h or higher) Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

More on Irma and other earth changing events coming tomorrow. I also do not want to lose sight of the civil unrest that has been occurring, and appears to be escalating for the near future.

Now let’s evaluate my 2017 Full Solar Eclipse prediction. Below I will write the exact words used on the very first article making my very very rare prediction.

July 21st 2017 –History has shown a connection between eclipse events and an increase of earth changing events which include earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, and extreme weather events. My published research identifies it may be the rapid temperature variations which can cause a shift (however slight) to Earth’s lithosphere (upper mantle). The full eclipse can also cause rapid temperature variations with our Oceans causing a destabilizing (however slight) in local atmospheric conditions which could contribute to extreme weather event including the escalation of tropical storms to hurricanes”. Original Article – Click Here

There are other physical earth changing events of which I will lay out in coming articles. Now let’s take a look at the second component of my prediction as related to charged particles and human behavior. In my July 25th article I stated the following: “In coming articles I will address perhaps a less scientific direction which suggest the current mode of global political dysfunction, may have some roots in history showing a pattern of “what happens below, reflects what happens above”. This suggests the turmoil which results from earth changing events appears to be in-sync with emotional unrest. Continued scientific data will of course follow.” Full Article – Click Here.

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On August 3rd I described in more detail the influence cosmic rays have on human behavior. The hippocampus is a small organ located within the brain’s medial temporal lobe forming an important part of the limbic system – the region that regulates emotions. It was just a few days later, we hear about Trumps threat to North Korea going so far as to threaten nuclear war. Then more unrest with nazi and white supremacist and of course the Russian connection. Full Article – Click Here

In the August 5th article I describe how the occurrence of a full solar eclipse sets off a ‘gravitational wave’ pulsating cosmic rays directly to Earth. There is a pre and post phase to this event, hence a building up and gradual reduction of charged particles. Furthermore, on August 7th I describe the connection between geo-physical effects and psycho-bio-social effect, both sharing a common denominator – charged particles. Full Article – Click Here

More Coming Tomorrow….

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Be a part of Science Of Cycles hurricane relief initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.  Cheers, Mitch

 

Hurricane Irma Could Pick Up Speed, But Path Still Uncertain

Hurricane Irma, with its 110 mph winds, posed no imminent threat to land Saturday as it drifted across the Atlantic Ocean.

The National Weather Service warned the Category 2 storm was likely to pick up speed and strength when it reaches the Caribbean Sea in the coming days, although it was too soon to say if Irma will reach the United States.

The storm was moving northwest at 15 mph, and could possibly affect the eastern end of Puerto Rico by Thursday morning.

Forecasters have not issued coastal watches or warnings for Irma.

Irma comes on the heels of the destructive Hurricane Harvey, which devolved into a tropical storm after pummelling the Texas coast with deadly flooding. Harvey was responsible for at least 44 deaths.

Tropical Storm Lidia Weakens After 5 Dead In Mexico’s Baja

CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico — A weakening Tropical Storm Lidia marched up Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula on Saturday after flooding streets and homes in resort cities, stranding tourists and leaving at least five people dead.

Lidia’s maximum sustained winds dropped to 40 mph (65 kph), just above the minimum threshold for a tropical storm, as its center passed over a sparsely populated area of the peninsula that is home to a large nature reserve and back out over Pacific waters. It was forecast to lose more strength over the course of the day.

Authorities have said the death toll could rise over the weekend as emergency crews surveyed the damage in villages with ramshackle homes. One person was considered missing and video broadcast on local networks showed vehicles being swept away by flooded rivers.

Baja California Sur Gov. Carlos Mendoza reported that Lidia had dumped about 27 inches (700 millimeters) of rain, “the largest amount of water we have had since 1933.”

The dead included two people electrocuted by power lines, a woman drowned after being swept away by water on a flooded street and a baby was ripped from its mother’s arms as she crossed a flooded area. Mendoza said late Friday that there was a fifth victim but did not give details.

State Tourism Secretary Luis Genaro Ruiz said about 20,000 foreign tourists were stranded after airlines suspended flights to the area.

About 1,400 people had sought refuge at storm shelters as the storm flooded streets and stranded tourists.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Lidia made landfall early Friday west of La Paz, the capital of Baja California Sur state.

The storm was centered about 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Punta Eugenia on Saturday evening and was heading northwest at about 10 mph (17 kph).

NASA Lays Out Plan to Defuse Yellowstone Supervolcano

Lying beneath the tranquil settings of Yellowstone National Park in the US lies an enormous magma chamber. It’s responsible for the geysers and hot springs that define the area, but for scientists at NASA, it’s also one of the greatest natural threats to human civilization as we know it.

“I was a member of the NASA Advisory Council on Planetary Defense which studied ways for NASA to defend the planet from asteroids and comets,” explains Brian Wilcox of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) at the California Institute of Technology. “I came to the conclusion during that study that the supervolcano threat is substantially greater than the asteroid or comet threat.”

There are around 20 known supervolcanoes on Earth, with major eruptions occurring on average once every 100,000 years. One of the greatest threats an eruption may pose is thought to be starvation, with a prolonged volcanic winter potentially prohibiting civilization from having enough food for the current population. In 2012, the United Nations estimated that food reserves worldwide would last 74 days.

When NASA scientists came to consider the problem, they found that the most logical solution could simply be to cool a supervolcano down. A volcano the size of Yellowstone is essentially a gigantic heat generator, equivalent to six industrial power plants. Yellowstone currently leaks about 60-70% of the heat coming up from below into the atmosphere, via water which seeps into the magma chamber through cracks. The remainder builds up inside the magma, enabling it to dissolve more and more volatile gases and surrounding rocks. Once this heat reaches a certain threshold, then an explosive eruption is inevitable.

I came to the conclusion that the supervolcano threat is substantially greater than the asteroid or comet threat – Brian Wilcox, NASA

But if more of the heat could be extracted, then the supervolcano would never erupt. NASA estimates that if a 35% increase in heat transfer could be achieved from its magma chamber, Yellowstone would no longer pose a threat. The only question is how?

One possibility is to simply increase the amount of water in the supervolcano. But from a practical perspective, it would likely be impossible to convince politicians to sanction such an initiative.

“Building a big aqueduct uphill into a mountainous region would be both costly and difficult, and people don’t want their water spent that way,” Wilcox says. “People are desperate for water all over the world and so a major infrastructure project, where the only way the water is used is to cool down a supervolcano, would be very controversial.”

Instead NASA have conceived a very different plan. They believe the most viable solution could be to drill up to 10km down into the supervolcano, and pump down water at high pressure. The circulating water would return at a temperature of around 350C (662F), thus slowly day by day extracting heat from the volcano. And while such a project would come at an estimated cost of around $3.46bn (£2.69bn), it comes with an enticing catch which could convince politicians to make the investment.

“Yellowstone currently leaks around 6GW in heat,” Wilcox says. “Through drilling in this way, it could be used to create a geothermal plant, which generates electric power at extremely competitive prices of around $0.10/kWh.

You would have to give the geothermal companies incentives to drill somewhat deeper and use hotter water than they usually would, but you would pay back your initial investment, and get electricity which can power the surrounding area for a period of potentially tens of thousands of years. And the long-term benefit is that you prevent a future supervolcano eruption which would devastate humanity.” But drilling into a supervolcano does not come without certain risks. Namely triggering the eruption you’re intending to prevent.

“The most important thing with this is to do no harm,” Wilcox says. “If you drill into the top of the magma chamber and try and cool it from there, this would be very risky. This could make the cap over the magma chamber more brittle and prone to fracture. And you might trigger the release of harmful volatile gases in the magma at the top of the chamber which would otherwise not be released.”

Instead, the idea is to drill in from the supervolcano from the lower sides, starting outside the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park, and extracting the heat from the underside of the magma chamber. “This way you’re preventing the heat coming up from below from ever reaching the top of the chamber which is where the real threat arises,” Wilcox says.

However those who instigate such a project will never see it to completion, or even have an idea whether it might be successful within their lifetime. Cooling Yellowstone in this manner would happen at a rate of one meter a year, taking of the order of tens of thousands of years until just cold rock was left. Although Yellowstone’s magma chamber would not need to be frozen solid to reach the point where it no longer posed a threat, there would be no guarantee that the endeavour would ultimately be successful for at least hundreds and possibly thousands of years.

But to prevent a catastrophe, such long-term thinking and planning may be the only choice. “With a project like this, you’d start the process and the main ongoing benefit you’d see in everyday terms is this new supply of electrical power,” Wilcox says.

Such a plan could be potentially applied to every active supervolcano on the planet, and NASA’s scientists are hoping that their blueprints will encourage more practical scientific discussion and debate for tackling the threat.

“When people first considered the idea of defending the Earth from an asteroid impact, they reacted in a similar way to the supervolcano threat,” Wilcox says. “People thought, as puny as we are, how can humans possibly prevent an asteroid from hitting the Earth.”

Well, it turns out if you engineer something which pushes very slightly for a very long time, you can make the asteroid miss the Earth. So the problem turns out to be easier than people think. In both cases it requires the scientific community to invest brain power and you have to start early. But Yellowstone explodes roughly every 600,000 years, and it is about 600,000 years since it last exploded, which should cause us to sit up and take notice.”