JUST IN: New Report Shows Atmospheric Radiation Increasing via Cosmic Rays

As you might have guessed, this is no surprise to this researcher. It is good to see the science community taking this scenario very seriously. What’s a bit different is the choice to go public with this hard hitting evidence highlighting the consequence of Earth’s weakening magnetic field, along with Cycle 24’s solar activity reaching solar minimum.

I am once again humbled to bring evidence showing my research is months, sometimes a year or two or three, ahead of fundamental science communities.

As a brief reminder, the less intensity of solar activity such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar flares, and coronal holes – the greater amount of galactic cosmic rays enter Earth’s atmosphere, and the higher charged particles penetrate Earth’s lithosphere, and in my personal research, has an influence down to the mantle.

Last week’s double launch of space weather balloons over Mexico and California was a success. The goal of the experiment was to measure cosmic rays in the atmosphere above both countries and compare the results. A first look at the data reveal big differences.

These curves show dose rate vs. altitude. They diverge rapidly above ~15,000 feet, with radiation levels over central California typically 1.5 times higher than over Mexico. This means air travelers over California can expect to receive significantly greater doses of cosmic radiation compared to their counterparts flying south of the border. In both places, radiation levels reached a peak in the stratosphere. At those altitudes, radiation dose rates were 60 times greater than sea level for Mexico, 90 times greater than sea level for California.

The reason for these differences is Earth’s magnetic field which, generally speaking, provides greater shielding against cosmic rays near the equator (Mexico) than at mid-latitudes (California). The radiation sensors onboard our helium balloons detect X-rays and gamma-rays in the energy range 10 keV to 20 MeV. They trace secondary cosmic rays, the spray of debris created when primary cosmic rays from deep space hit the top of Earth’s atmosphere.

Soon after our monitoring program began, we quickly realized that radiation levels were increasing. Why? The main reason is the solar cycle. In recent years, sunspot counts have plummeted as the Sun’s magnetic field weakens. This has allowed more cosmic rays from deep space to penetrate the solar system. As 2017 winds down, our latest measurements show the increase continuing at pace–with an interesting exception due to an influx of a large X9.3 solar flare.

In Sept. 2017, the quiet Sun surprised space weather forecasters with a sudden outburst of explosive activity. On Sept. 3rd, a huge sunspot appeared. In the week that followed, it unleashed the strongest solar flare in more than a decade (X9-class), hurled a powerful CME toward Earth, and sparked a severe geomagnetic storm (G4-class). During the onslaught we quickened the pace of balloon launches and found radiation dropping to levels we hadn’t seen since 2015. The flurry of solar flares and CMEs actually pushed some cosmic rays away from Earth.

Interestingly, after the Sun’s outburst radiation levels in the stratosphere took more than 2 months to fully rebound. Now they are back on track, increasing steadily as the quiet Sun resumes its progress toward Solar Minimum. The fact that we can make these measurements over California shows that you do not have to travel to polar regions to experience space weather. We have known charged particles can effect weather patterns worldwide.

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Update on Kids Christmas Fund

We have been able to place a few wonderful gifts under the tree for my two beautiful daughters thanks to you. If it’s possible, I will try to fulfill their Christmas list the best I can. There are two big items each has asked for. ———–Alexa (9yrs) wants one of those new hoover boards. Sophia (5yrs) wants an AmericanGirl doll “Tenney”.

For those seeing this for the first time, there really is no need to explain further this uncomfortable position I’ve put myself in. Because of my choices some years ago to venture off into independent research and publishing – I am learning, mostly the hard way, to navigate the peaks and valleys of not having that comfortable umbrella of the more structured agencies. We all make our choices – so it is what it is.
Cheers, Mitch
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Here’s wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Wishing you lots of love, joy and happiness. May your Christmas sparkle with moments of love, laughter and goodwill, And may the year ahead be full of contentment and joy.

Kids Christmas Fund

 

 

PART II – Press Release of Smallest Ozone Hole in 30 Years is Misguided; Here’s Why

Many of you will remember the numerous press release announcing the ozone hole was the smallest it has been over the last 30 years going back to 1988. NASA, NOAA and a half dozen other space agencies have stated the cause of this reduction was due to global warming. Yes, global warming, due to the warmer jet stream vortex around the Antarctic. This is ‘political tug’ number 1.

Here comes “political tug” number 2. Just two or three paragraphs later, the covey reports make a 180° turn reminding us that it is humans created the ozone hole, clearly insinuating only humans can heal it. Of course they go on to say most humans alive today will never see this because the ozone hole will not be healed until 2070.

Now here is Mitch’s prediction. Within around eight months, the healing ozone hole will be as large – or larger than it was in 1985. Why eight months? Because recent research, as a result of incredible modern technology such as Fermi, Voyager, Cassini, Ace, Ulysses, Planck, and Herschel to name a few.

If my prediction is correct, you have to ask yourself: “What will global warming enthusiast will say when the ozone is “larger” in less than a year from now?” You have known my reports on a lessening magnetic field, and an increase in galactic cosmic rays – and then add the fact we are approximately two years away from Cycle 24’s solar minimum apex.

New research indicates a time lag of approximately eight months between solar-activity data and cosmic-ray flux measurements in space. In addition, factor in solar minimum (lowest period of solar activity), and Earth’s weakening magnetic field, the sum of which would indicate a period increased of cosmic ray showers.

There may be a Part III highlighting what is only recently been acknowledged, that high-energy cosmic rays penetrate the Earth’s lithosphere which I hypothesize contributes to the heating of the surface, including the world’s oceans.

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Cheers, Mitch

 

Handheld Cosmic Ray Detector Available to Public – Coming Soon

First, let me announce Part – II of “Mitch’s New Prediction” is coming later today. But I wanted to make public the possibility of being a distributor for this new device of a handheld cosmic ray detector of which I may be able to purchase 10 units per order.

So I’m interested to know if this is something you would be interested in, perhaps as a Christmas gift or one for yourself, or both. I’m not sure what the price would be, but I’m hoping it will stay around $125.

Personally, I believe this product is more than just a novelty item, new studies are indicating cosmic rays are more abundant than previously known, and with our weakening magnetic field, more harmful.

Further details on cosmic rays and recent “political tugs” as related to the ozone reduction will be coming forth in a few hours and is related to my new prediction.

Earth’s atmosphere is constantly showered with high-energy cosmic rays that have been blasted from supernovae and other astrophysical phenomena far beyond the Solar System. When cosmic rays collide with Earth’s atmosphere, they decay into charged particles – muons, that are slightly heavier than an electron.

 

Cosmic rays last only fractions of a second, and during their fleeting lifespan they can be found through every layer of Earth’s atmosphere, circulating in the air around us and raining onto the surface at a rate similar to a light drizzle. A smaller number of cosmic rays can penetrate Earth’s surface and travel several kilometers through rock and ice.

Physicists at MIT have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray detector to track these invisible particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a cosmic ray passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable cosmic ray detector available today.

The researchers, led by Spencer Axani, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Physics, have designed the detector with students in mind. They have started an outreach program that lists parts to purchase and detailed instructions on how to assemble, calibrate, and run the detector. The team estimates that an average high school student should spend about four hours building a detector for the first time, and just one hour building it a second time.

 

Once up and running, detectors can be carried around to measure cosmic rays rates in virtually any environment. The team has helped supply nearly 100 detectors to high school and college students, who have sent the instruments up in planes and weather balloons to measure cosmic ray rates at high altitudes.

The researchers have published the first version of the detector design in the American Journal of Physics. Axani’s co-authors are MIT professor of physics Janet Conrad and junior Conor Kirby.

BREAKING NEWS: Amazing New Evidence Details a Far More Intricate Relation Between Galactic Cosmic Rays, Solar Weather and Terrestrial (Earth) Weather

Before I launch into this new amazing news, most of which affirms Science Of Cycles research, I need to give notice of a snafu which occurred on my server holding back your emails to me, and just at the time I requested your feedback on my prediction record as regards to the Aug. 2017 full solar eclipse.

I really would like your feedback on the outcomes which occurred during the 24+ day window and its associated cause i.e. generated gravity wave, sudden cooling and warming of weather, and the related shift in the jet stream and ocean current. Last but not least, the flux of charged particles in the way of galactic cosmic rays and its effect on the human brain and emotions.  To respond, send an email to mitch@scienceofcycles.com

I also wish to thank those who sent in a donation which added to about $300.00, it provided some relief, but covered about 1/4 of what’s needed. If you can add to this much needed fund raiser, please go to one of the banners below.

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BREAKING NEWS: Three Powerful Published Research Study’s Play a Large Role in Terrestrial (Earth) Weather, Space Weather, and Galactic Cycles

Evidence for a Time Lag in Solar Modulation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

The solar modulation effect of cosmic rays in the heliosphere is an and particle dependent phenomenon that arises from a combination of basic particle transport processes such as diffusion, convection, adiabatic cooling, and drift motion.

Making use of a large collection of time-resolved cosmic-ray data from recent space missions, we construct a simple predictive model of solar modulation that depends on direct solar-physics inputs: the number of solar sunspots and the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet.

Under this framework, we present calculations of cosmic-ray proton spectra, positron/electron and antiproton/proton ratios, and their time dependence in connection with the evolving solar activity.

We report evidence for a time lag of approximately eight months, between solar-activity data and cosmic-ray flux measurements in space, which reflects the dynamics of the formation of the modulation region. This result enables us to forecast the cosmic-ray flux near Earth well in advance by monitoring solar activity.

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New Discovery: Cosmic Ray Flux Caused by Tidal Disruption Events

Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) are processes where stars are torn apart by the strong gravitational force near to a massive or supermassive black hole. If a jet is launched in such a process, particle acceleration may take place in internal shocks. Daniel Biehl, Department of Physics, Arizona State University and co-author Denise Boncioli, Dept. of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata published their paper in the journal American Physical Society.

We demonstrate that jetted TDEs can simultaneously describe the observed neutrino and cosmic ray fluxes at the highest energies if stars with heavier compositions, such as carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, are tidally disrupted and these events are sufficiently abundant.

We simulate the photo-hadronic interactions both in the TDE jet and in the propagation through the extragalactic space and we show that the simultaneous description of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) and PeV neutrino data implies that a nuclear cascade in the jet develops by photo-hadronic interactions.

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NEW: Daily/Monthly Variation of Cosmic Ray Intensity

The solar modulation of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) is revealed in the record of neutron monitors in terms of daily variation. Both day-to-day and long-term daily variations have been investigated for the period from 1965 to 2015. This was done simultaneously along with geomagnetic disruption as measured in the Ap Index over a twelve month period which was averaged independently and collectively on per month basis.

Here the Ap index was used as a placeholder for solar flux on interplanetary disturbances. It was discovered that on an average basis, the diurnal (daily) amplitude of cosmic rays is considerably lower in the years of high Ap values. During periods of low solar flux, the average daily amplitude of cosmic rays was high through the period 1965 to 2015.

Thank you for your continued support. We’re now about half way there.

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Be a part of Science Of Cycles Multi-Disaster Relief Initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.   Cheers, Mitch

 

 

Evidence for a Time-Lag in Solar Resonance of Galactic Cosmic Rays

The solar modulation effect of cosmic rays in the heliosphere is an energy, time, and particle dependent phenomenon that arises from a combination of basic particle transport processes such as diffusion, convection, adiabatic cooling, and drift motion.

Making use of a large collection of time-resolved cosmic-ray data from recent space missions, we construct a simple predictive model of solar modulation that depends on direct solar-physics inputs: the number of solar sunspots and the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet.

Under this framework, we present calculations of cosmic-ray proton spectra, positron/electron and antiproton/proton ratios, and their time dependence in connection with the evolving solar activity. We report evidence for a time lag of approximately eight months, between solar-activity data and cosmic-ray flux measurements in space, which reflects the dynamics of the formation of the modulation region. This result enables us to forecast the cosmic-ray flux near Earth well in advance by monitoring solar activity.

Surprise Solar Event and Galactic Cosmic Rays Associated with Ozone Hole Fluctuation

The fast flow associated with the northern extension Coronal Hole, which crossed the central meridian on Nov 4th has now arrived to Earth. The solar wind speed has increased up to the current value of 620 km/s, and the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field was observed mainly southward for a long period of time of more than 3 hours.

This strong southward field, concurrent with a fast solar wind produced a geomagnetic storm. NOAA reported the Kp event at level 6 and local stations at Dourbes reported K=5.  The high speed stream is expected to persist until Nov 10th and further minor to moderate geomagnetic storms are highly possible.

Ozone Fluctuation Caused by Galactic Cosmic Rays… 

Recent studies have presented evidence indicating cosmic rays, rather than solar winds play a dominant role in breaking down ozone-depleting molecules and then ozone. Cosmic rays are energy particles originating in space.

Ozone is a gas mostly concentrated in the ozone layer, a region located in the stratosphere several miles above the Earth’s surface. It absorbs almost all of the Sun’s high-frequency ultraviolet light, which is potentially damaging to life and causes such diseases as skin cancer and cataracts. The Antarctic ozone hole is larger than the size of North America.

More on Galactic Cosmic Rays Effect to Earth Coming Next…

 

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Science Of Cycles Multi-Disaster Relief Initiative

Be a part of Science Of Cycles Multi-Disaster Relief Initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.   Cheers, Mitch

 

 

NASA Investigates Invisible Magnetic Bubbles In Outer Solar System

Space may seem empty, but it’s actually a dynamic place populated with near-invisible matter, and dominated by forces, in particular those created by magnetic fields. Magnetospheres — the magnetic fields around most planets — exist throughout our solar system. They deflect high-energy, charged particles called cosmic rays that are spewed out by the Sun or come from interstellar space. Along with atmospheres, they happen to protect the planets’ surfaces from this harmful radiation.

But not all magnetospheres are created equal: Venus and Mars do not have magnetospheres at all, while the other planets — and one moon — have ones that are surprisingly different.

NASA has launched a fleet of missions to study the planets in our solar system — many of which have sent back crucial information about magnetospheres. The twin Voyagers measured magnetic fields as they traveled out to the far reaches of the solar system, and discovered Uranus and Neptune’s magnetospheres. Other planetary missions including Galileo, Cassini and Juno, and a number of spacecraft that orbit Earth, provide observations to create a comprehensive understanding of how planets form magnetospheres, as well as how they continue to interact with the dynamic space environment around them.

Earth

Earth’s magnetosphere is created by the constantly moving molten metal inside Earth. This invisible “force field” around our planet has a general shape resembling an ice cream cone, with a rounded front and a long, trailing tail that faces away from the sun. The magnetosphere is shaped that way because of the near-constant flow of solar wind and magnetic field from the Sun-facing side.

Earth’s and other magnetospheres deflect charged particles away from the planet — but also trap energetic particles in radiation belts. Auroras are caused by particles that rain down into the atmosphere, usually not far from the magnetic poles.

It’s possible that Earth’s magnetosphere was essential for the development of conditions friendly to life, so learning about magnetospheres around other planets and moons is a big step toward determining if life could have evolved there.

Mercury

Mercury, with a substantial iron-rich core, has a magnetic field that is only about 1 percent as strong as Earth’s. It is thought that the planet’s magnetosphere is compressed by the intense solar wind, limiting its extent. The MESSENGER satellite orbited Mercury from 2011 to 2015, helping us understand our tiny terrestrial neighbor.

Jupiter

After the Sun, Jupiter has by far the strongest and biggest magnetic field in our solar system — it stretches about 12 million miles from east to west, almost 15 times the width of the Sun. (Earth’s, on the other hand, could easily fit inside the Sun — except for its outstretched tail.) Jupiter does not have a molten metal core; instead, its magnetic field is created by a core of compressed liquid metallic hydrogen.

One of Jupiter’s moons, Io, has powerful volcanic activity that spews particles into Jupiter’s magnetosphere. These particles create intense radiation belts and auroras around Jupiter.

Ganymede, Jupiter’s largest moon, also has its own magnetic field and magnetosphere — making it the only moon with one. Its weak field, nestled in Jupiter’s enormous shell, scarcely ruffles the planet’s magnetic field.

Saturn

Saturn’s huge ring system transforms the shape of its magnetosphere. That’s because oxygen and water molecules evaporating from the rings funnel particles into the space around the planet. Some of Saturn’s moons help trap these particles, pulling them out of Saturn’s magnetosphere, though those with active volcanic geysers — like Enceladus — spit out more material than they take in. NASA’s Cassini mission followed in the Voyagers’ wake, and studied Saturn’s magnetic field from orbit around the ringed planet between 2004 and 2017.

Uranus

Uranus’ magnetosphere wasn’t discovered until 1986, when data from Voyager 2’s flyby revealed weak, variable radio emissions and confirmed when Voyager 2 measured the magnetic field directly. Uranus’ magnetic field and rotation axis are out of alignment by 59 degrees, unlike Earth’s, whose magnetic field and rotation axis are nearly aligned. On top of that, the magnetic field does not go directly through the center of the planet, so the strength of the magnetic field varies dramatically across the surface. This misalignment also means that Uranus’ magnetotail — the part of the magnetosphere that trails behind the planet, away from the Sun — is twisted into a long corkscrew.

Neptune

Neptune was also visited by Voyager 2, in 1989. Its magnetosphere is offset from its rotation axis, but only by 47 degrees. Similar to Uranus, Neptune’s magnetic field strength varies across the planet. This means that auroras can appear across the planet — not just close to the poles, like on Earth, Jupiter and Saturn.

And beyond

Outside of our solar system, auroras, which indicate the presence of a magnetosphere, have been spotted on brown dwarfs — objects that are bigger than planets but smaller than stars. There’s also evidence to suggest that some giant exoplanets have magnetospheres, but we have yet to see conclusive proof. As scientists learn more about the magnetospheres of planets in our solar system, it can help us one day identify magnetospheres around more distant planets as well.