BREAKING NEWS: Tropical Storm Barry Expected to Make Landfall as a Hurricane

A state of emergency has been declared in Louisiana and the National Guard activated, and mandatory evacuations have been ordered in some places along the Louisiana coast as Tropical Storm Barry formed over the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday morning.

This is day 9 of my 14 day window related to July 2nd’s full solar eclipse. Here is a paragraph published July 2nd telling of what could happen evidenced by my research of historical data:

Close to and during a full solar eclipse, it is the sudden temperature fluctuation which can cause a chain reaction. Producing a sudden and rapid shift in both the jet stream and ocean currents, can cause the destabilization of set seasonal patterns. Additionally, what is often referred to as Extreme Weather involving tornadoes, hurricanes, straight line winds, and wind shears is almost always related to shifting ocean and jet stream currents. FULL ARTICLE

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) declared Barry the second named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph and it was moving west at 5 mph. Barry is forecast to make landfall along the Louisiana coast Friday night or Saturday.

“There is a fairly high chance that Tropical Storm Barry will become a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale before making landfall,” according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski.

 

Hubble Uncovers Black Hole That Shouldn’t Exist

As if black holes weren’t mysterious enough, astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have found an unexpected thin disk of material furiously whirling around a supermassive black hole at the heart of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away.

The conundrum is that the disk shouldn’t be there, based on current astronomical theories. However, the unexpected presence of a disk so close to a black hole offers a unique opportunity to test Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity. General relativity describes gravity as the curvature of space and special relativity describes the relationship between time and space.

“We’ve never seen the effects of both general and special relativity in visible light with this much clarity,” said Marco Chiaberge of the European Space Agency, and the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University, both in Baltimore, Maryland, a member of the team that conducted the Hubble study.

“This is an intriguing peek at a disk very close to a black hole, so close that the velocities and the intensity of the gravitational pull are affecting how the photons of light look,” added the study’s first author, Stefano Bianchi of Università degli Studi Roma Tre, in Rome, Italy. “We cannot understand the data unless we include the theories of relativity.”

Black holes in certain types of galaxies like NGC 3147 are malnourished because there is not enough gravitationally captured material to feed them regularly. So, the thin haze of infalling material puffs up like a donut rather than flattening out in a pancake-shaped disk. Therefore, it is very puzzling why there is a thin disk encircling a starving black hole in NGC 3147 that mimics much more powerful disks found in extremely active galaxies with engorged, monster black holes.

“We thought this was the best candidate to confirm that below certain luminosities, the accretion disk doesn’t exist anymore,” explained Ari Laor of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology located in Haifa, Israel. “What we saw was something completely unexpected. We found gas in motion producing features we can explain only as being produced by material rotating in a thin disk very close to the black hole.”

The astronomers initially selected this galaxy to validate accepted models about lower-luminosity active galaxies — those with black holes that are on a meager diet of material. Models predict that an accretion disk forms when ample amounts of gas are trapped by a black hole’s strong gravitational pull. This infalling matter emits lots of light, producing a brilliant beacon called a quasar, in the case of the most well-fed black holes. Once less material is pulled into the disk, it begins to break down, becomes fainter, and changes structure.

“The type of disk we see is a scaled-down quasar that we did not expect to exist,” Bianchi said. “It’s the same type of disk we see in objects that are 1,000 or even 100,000 times more luminous. The predictions of current models for gas dynamics in very faint active galaxies clearly failed.”

The disk is so deeply embedded in the black hole’s intense gravitational field that the light from the gas disk is modified, according to Einstein’s theories of relativity, giving astronomers a unique look at the dynamic processes close to a black hole.

Hubble clocked material whirling around the black hole as moving at more than 10% of the speed of light. At those extreme velocities, the gas appears to brighten as it travels toward Earth on one side, and dims as it speeds away from our planet on the other side (an effect called relativistic beaming). Hubble’s observations also show that the gas is so entrenched in the gravitational well the light is struggling to climb out, and therefore appears stretched to redder wavelengths. The black hole’s mass is around 250 million Suns.

The researchers used Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to observe matter swirling deep inside the disk. A spectrograph is a diagnostic tool that divides light from an object into its many individual wavelengths to determine its speed, temperature, and other characteristics at a very high precision. The astronomers needed STIS’s sharp resolution to isolate the faint light from the black-hole region and block out contaminating starlight.

“Without Hubble, we wouldn’t have been able to see this because the black-hole region has a low luminosity,” Chiaberge said. “The luminosities of the stars in the galaxy outshine anything in the nucleus. So if you observe it from the ground, you’re dominated by the brightness of the stars, which drowns the feeble emission from the nucleus.”

The team hopes to use Hubble to hunt for other very compact disks around low-wattage black holes in similar active galaxies.

The team’s paper will appear online today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The international team of astronomers in this study consists of Stefano Bianchi (Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy); Robert Antonucci (University of California, Santa Barbara, California); Alessandro Capetti (INAF — Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Pino Torinese, Italy); Marco Chiaberge (Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland); Ari Laor (Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel); Loredana Bassani (INAF/IASF Bologna, Italy); Francisco Carrera (CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain); Fabio La Franca, Andrea Marinucci, Giorgio Matt, and Riccardo Middei (Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Roma, Italy); and Francesca Panessa (INAF Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome, Italy).

Tsunami Threat Expires Following 6.9-Magnitude Earthquake In Indonesia

A powerful earthquake struck under the water surrounding Indonesia, prompting a tsunami warning which encompasses hundreds of the country’s 17,000 islands.

Indonesian officials issued the tsunami warning for coastal areas after the earthquake occurred in the Molucca Sea, which is located between the islands of Sulawesi and Maluku. The warning has since expired and there is no tsunami threat at this time.

The United States Geological Survey stated that the earthquake had a magnitude of 6.9, while officials from Indonesia stated that the earthquake was slightly stronger with a magnitude of 7.1.

The tsunami warning was in effect for the eastern coast of North Sulawesi and the western coast of North Maluku. Latest projections are for a tsunami of 0.5 of a meter (1.5 feet) or less.

The earthquake rumbled at 10:08 p.m. local time (11:08 a.m. EDT) on Sunday.

There is potential for heavy-intensity rainfall with lightning, thunder, and gusty winds until 3:30 a.m. local time (WIB).

The earthquake caused panic in the city of Ternate on the island chain of Maluku.

“Showers and thunderstorms will continue to be around central Indonesia through Monday,” according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Maura Kelly.

BREAKING NEWS: Magnitude 7.1 Earthquake Hits Southern California

Yes, this 7.1 magnitude earthquake which hit Friday east of Bakersfield, Ca. near Ridgecrest, was predicted as part of my 14 day window after a full solar eclipse. In addition to the 7.1 quake which followed an earlier 6.4 quake, several aftershocks have been recorded. Seismologists in the area believe some 400 aftershocks are expected over the next several days.

The mag. 7.3 quake which hit NW of Saumlaki, Indonesia on June 24th also fits in the historical pattern of 14 days prior to an eclipse – and 14 days post event. Click Here for details.

I wish I could say it’s over, but there are 10 more days to go – and since seismic events have been on the wane over the last several months, I expect more large events to continue.

See article published on July 4th so understand the research behind my 28 window surrounding a full solar eclipse. The unsettling title of the article is “Probability of Earth Changing Events Within 14 Day”.

Stay tuned for reports of ongoing events….

 

 

7,1 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Near Ridgecrest In Southern California

A 7.1-magnitude earthquake rocked Southern California on Friday night — the second temblor to hit near Ridgecrest in less than two days.

The latest earthquake occurred 11 miles northeast of Ridgecrest, according to the US Geological Survey. It rocked buildings and cracked foundations, sending jittery residents out on the streets.

It comes a day after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake centered near Ridgecrest rattled the state Thursday. That earthquake has produced more than 1,400 aftershocks, scientists said.

Multiple fires and injuries have been reported in Ridgecrest — about 150 miles from Los Angeles — after Friday’s earthquake, Kern County spokeswoman Megan Person said. The county has activated an emergency operations center, the fire department tweeted.

The San Bernardino County Fire Department said it has received multiple reports of damage from northwest communities in the county.

“Homes shifted, foundation cracks, retaining walls down,” the department said. “One injury (minor) with firefighters treating patient.”

Localized power outages in LA

In central Los Angeles, Friday’s earthquake felt stronger than the one a day earlier, making buildings rock back and forth forcefully. Donald Castle, who lives in Porterville west of Ridgecrest, said his house shook for between 20 and 25 seconds.

“It was more of a shake than what we had on the Fourth. It lasted longer and was more rolling,” he said.

Public safety units are being deployed throughout the city ” to ensure safety and inspect infrastructure,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

The Los Angeles Fire Department said there were reports of wires down and localized power outages in some parts of the city. Fire crews are still surveying the city, it said, but no major damage to infrastructure has been identified so far.

The fire department is no longer in Earthquake mode and has determined there are no injuries or significant damage in Los Angeles city, chief Ralph M. Terrazas tweeted.

The shaking was felt in Mexico and Las Vegas

The shaking was felt as far as Mexico, according to the USGS website.

The NBA Summer League game between the New Orleans Pelicans and the New York Knicks in Las Vegas was postponed Friday following reports of the quake. Scoreboards and speakers near the ceiling of the arena shook when the earthquake hit.

Quakes are part of an ongoing system

CalTech seismologist Lucy Jones said Friday both earthquakes are part of an ongoing sequence, of a “very energetic system.”

The latest 7.1 earthquake was the mainshock, while Thursday’s 6.4 magnitude shake was a foreshock, according to Jones. She said Friday’s earthquake was 10 times stronger than the one a day prior.

The 7.1 magnitude shake was five times bigger than Thursday’s, but released 11 times the amount of energy than the 6.4 shake, CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller said.
Officials are not ruling out that there could be more earthquakes coming.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom said he has activated the state emergency operation center to its highest level.

“The state is coordinating mutual aid to local first responders,” he tweeted Friday night.

Magnitude 6.4 Earthquake Rattles Southern California

A magnitude 6.4 earthquake rattled a large swath of Southern California on Thursday morning, according to USGS.

There are no immediate reports of damages or injuries.

The quake hit at 10:33 a.m. near the town of Ridgecrest.

It was originally recorded as a 6.6 magnitude earthquake.

The quake was felt in Bakersfield minutes after it struck. People from the desert to the Pacific coast in Southern California reported feeling it.

Volcano Erupts On Italian Island Of Stromboli, Killing One Person

A volcano on the Italian island of Stromboli erupted Wednesday, releasing hot trapped magma in a powerful explosion, killing one person and enveloping the popular tourist destination in ash, witnesses and local officials said.

The one fatality, believed to be a tourist, was killed by falling stones during a hike, a rescue service official said. A second person was injured.

Italian news agency ANSA says the blast sent about 30 tourists jumping into the sea for safety.

The unexpected eruption started fires on the western side of the small Mediterranean island, which lies north of Sicily, off the toe of Italy. Fire crews were being called in from nearby locations and a Canadair plane was already in action.

“We saw the explosion from the hotel. There was a loud roar,” said Michela Favorito, who works in a hotel near Fico Grande, on the east side of the island.

“We plugged our ears and after this a cloud of ash swept over us. The whole sky is full of ash, a fairly large cloud,” she told Reuters.

Fiona Carter, a British tourist on the island of Panarea, some 17 miles from Stromboli, heard the blast.

“We turned around to see a mushroom cloud coming from Stromboli. Everyone was in shock. Then red hot lava started running down the mountain towards the little village of Ginostra,” she told Reuters.

“The cloud got bigger, white and gray. It enveloped Ginostra and now the cloud has covered Stromboli entirely. Several boats set off for Stromboli,” she added.

According to the geology.com website, Stromboli is one of the most active volcanoes on the planet and has been erupting almost continuously since 1932.