Red Sprites At The Edge Of Space

Solar activity is very low. Nevertheless, space weather continues. High above late-summer thunderstorms in Africa, red sprites are dancing across the cloudtops, reaching up to the edge of space itself. Astronauts onboard the International Space Station photographed this specimen (circled) on March 14th.

redsprite_strip

Sprites are an exotic form of “upward lightning.” They are a true space weather phenomenon, inhabiting the upper reaches of Earth’s atmosphere alongside meteors, and some auroras. Some researchers believe sprites are linked to cosmic rays: subatomic particles from deep space striking the top of Earth’s atmosphere produce secondary electrons that, in turn, could provide the spark that triggers the elaborate red forms.

Although sprites have been seen for at least a century, most scientists did not believe they existed until after 1989 when sprites were photographed by cameras onboard the space shuttle. They have since been photographed many times from the ISS.

Author: Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.