Strong Storm Brings Flash Flooding, Tornadoes, Damaging Winds To East Coast

A strong storm brought torrential rain, gusty winds and severe weather to parts of the East Coast on Friday.

There were six reported tornadoes – five in Florida and one in Virginia — on Friday, including four confirmed tornadoes near Tampa Bay. Two of these confirmed tornadoes were EF-1. More damage surveys are expected today in the region.

Wind gusts over 70 mph were reported in parts of Maryland, which led to building damage in Carroll County, Maryland. In nearby Baltimore, strong wind gusts did major damage to an Amazon facility, toppling a 50-foot brick wall and killing one person.

In southern Pennsylvania, over 3 inches of rain was reported in Littlestown, Pennsylvania. Farther east in Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley, water rescues were reported near Pottsgrove.

Heavy rain associated with this strong storm is still moving through the Northeast Saturday morning. Some flooding remains possible, especially in parts of New England, with localized rainfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per hour. An initial burst of strong winds is likely in New England.

However, as the storm quickly moves off to the north and east, it will rapidly intensify as it heads into southern Canada. Behind the storm, widespread strong winds will develop in the Northeast with gusts of 30 to 50 mph expected. Power outages and downed trees will be possible and wind advisories and high wind warnings have been issued for a large part of the Northeast through Saturday.

The storm will depart the region later Saturday, with winds calming down overnight. Sunday is looking much quieter in the Northeast, including for the New York City Marathon.

New storm developing

Meanwhile, a new system will quickly develop in the central U.S. on Saturday. As the storm intensifies on Saturday night and early Sunday, a large line of storms with locally heavy rain is possible from Texas to Illinois. While the severe threat should remain limited, a couple of damaging wind gusts are possible on the southern end of the line of storms, particularly in parts of Louisiana.

Up to 1 inch of rain is possible along the cold front. Farther north, some light snow is possible in parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota as the storm interacts with cold air.

The storm will slide off to the east by Monday with rain likely from the Great Lakes to the Carolinas.

Severe weather chances in South
Unfortunately, the weather pattern is looking quite active next week, with yet another storm developing by Sunday and Monday.

By Monday, a powerful storm, with an advancing cold front will slide through the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys. As a result, the chances for a significant severe weather event are increasing for late Monday and into Tuesday — Election Day. The main risk will be damaging winds and possibly several tornadoes.

The threat will slide off to the southeast by Tuesday, with a threat for more damaging winds, tornadoes and hail.

And another storm looks to be developing immediately behind this storm as well.

UPDATED: Science Of Cycles Important Announcement

Here is an update to Science Of Cycles moving forward

I have been able to put off the Spectrum commitment for 7 days – for the reason that four people have come forward with $100 monthly commitments to keep SOC available to everyone. If just six more folks come forward with the same commitment, we will be off and running within 7to 10 days.

However, it certainly could be one person with a $500 monthly provision and one person with a $100 stipend or some combination thereof and we’re set. Note: When using this email address to reply (earthchanges@earthlink.net) you might get a auto-response to confirm you are not a robot – which is used to minimize spam of course.

Below is the original letter:

I am speaking with Spectrum network that offers a news channel in addition to their regular lineup. They are interested in my services to produce a science broadcast focused on many of the topics I cover on SOC.

Sounds great, and I should be jubilant; however, there is a reason I have not accepted previous offers. From past experience as well as speaking to many scientists I have interviewed over the years, I am reminded when you sell your services to agencies such as NASA and NOAA, freedom of expression is thwarted…and sometimes to extreme measures.

So before I sign on with Spectrum, I feel a strong compulsion to try one last time to maintain my independence, allowing me to present to you an unedited full throat analysis of events discovered and a full perspective of current research which is often not easily made available to the public.

With this in mind, I present this final evaluation. To maintain SOC services available to everyone, a need of a few sponsors to support a monthly provision of $1,000, or an annual support of $12,000. As you might have guessed, these amounts are simply to offset other expenses I incur. Whether it is one sponsor or divided by twenty sponsors, the sum amount remains the same of $12,000 yr. or $1,200 monthly.

In the last two years I have experimented with community based funding by placing a donation banner along with occasional special interest request. Although the community based funding did accomplish a significant goal – keeping this information available to everyone – I did find myself digging deep into my own pockets, which is simply not sustainable.

A benefit to you as a sponsor: I am more than happy to provide you with as much or as little exposure as you wish. In the ways of exposure, I will provide whatever advertising you need in the way of banners, announcements, tags on newsletters, and to provide a bit more exposure – I will announce you or company when I am a guest on talk shows and conferences.

My presumption is that you would agree that maintaining an emphasis of keeping our latest news and research available to everyone is a worthy cause. Perhaps the first and most important reason is the fact that the latest scientific findings of trends and cycles are likely to have an impact on all of us and I hope to have the freedom to inform you without restraint and in real-time.

I hope you find this proposal pleasing, and I look forward to further discussions to make sure we have win on all sides. You can contact me at: **earthchanges@earthlink.net**

Cheers, Mitch Battros

BREAKING NEWS: 6.8 Earthquake Hits North Tip of Cascadia Subduction Zone

Three powerful earthquakes struck off the coast of British Columbia Sunday night within an hour. This area sits at the northern end of the Cascadia Subduction Zone which is monitored closely due to its prediction of a cyclical mega-quake.

The United States Geological Survey reports a preliminary magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck near Port Hardy, Canada at 10:39 p.m. local time at a depth of about 7 miles (11 kilometers).

At 11:16 p.m., a magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck the same area at a depth of 13 miles (21 kilometers). At 11:22 p.m. a magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck the same area at a depth of 6 miles (10 kilometers). The U.S. National Tsunami Warning Center reported that a tsunami was not expected.

There was no initial word on damage or injury resulting from the quakes. The earthquakes centered about 355 miles northwest of Seattle. Several smaller quakes followed, including a 4.9-magnitude temblor at 11:36 p.m. PDT.

JUST IN: Cosmic Ray Particles That Tunnel Through Earth

A fountain of high-energy particles that resembles an upside-down cosmic-ray shower is detected for the second time by the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA).

ANITA detected an unexpected signal – radio waves coming from the ice with an inverted phase. The detection suggest the signals came from upward-moving particles that tunneled through Earth before erupting from the ice.

In a paper published in the journal American Geophysical Union (AGU) Space Weather, associate professor Nathan Schwadron of the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) and the department of physics says that due to this solar cycles vast drop in solar activity, a stream of cosmic ray particles are flooding Earth’s atmosphere – and further driving in and through Earth’s core.

In addition to a lower solar minimum cycle, Earth’s magnetic field continues to weaken which also allows a greater number of cosmic particles to enter our atmosphere. Some cosmic charged particles known as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) are millions of times greater in kinetic energy than cosmic rays. These powerful particles plow right through Earth’s upper and lower mantle, into the outer and inner core.

My research suggest the radiation of these particles has a significant influence on Earth’s core by increasing temperatures. As a natural result, Earth compensates to maintain its ambient temperature. This is done by sweating. Just as us humans sweat through our pores to manage an overheated body, the Earth sweats by releasing magma through its pores known as ‘mantle plumes’.

More Coming Later…

 

Scientists Develop A New Way To Remotely Measure Earth’s Magnetic Field

Researchers in Canada, the United States and Europe have developed a new way to remotely measure Earth’s magnetic field—by zapping a layer of sodium atoms floating 100 kilometres above the planet with lasers on the ground.

The technique, documented this week in Nature Communications, fills a gap between measurements made at the Earth’s surface and at much higher altitude by orbiting satellites.

“The magnetic field at this altitude in the atmosphere is strongly affected by physical processes such as solar storms and electric currents in the ionosphere,” says Paul Hickson an astrophysicist at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and author on the paper.

“Our technique not only measures magnetic field strength at an altitude that has traditionally been hidden, it has the side benefit of providing new information on space weather and atomic processes occurring in the region.”

Sodium atoms are continually deposited in the mesosphere by meteors that vaporize as they enter Earth’s atmosphere. Researchers at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the University of Mainz and UBC used a ground-based laser to excite the layer of sodium atoms and monitor the light they emit in response.

“The excited sodium atoms wobble like spinning tops in the presence of a magnetic field,” explains Hickson. “We sense this as a periodic fluctuation in the light we’re monitoring, and can use that to determine the magnetic field strength.”

Hickson and UBC Ph.D. student Joschua Hellemeier developed the photon counting instrument used to measure the light coming back from the excited sodium atoms, and participated in observations conducted at astronomical observatories in La Palma.

The ESO team, led by Bonaccini Calia, pioneered world-leading laser technology for astronomical adaptive optics used in the experiment. Project lead Felipe Pedreros and Dmitry Budker (Johannes Gutenberg University), Simon Rochester and Ronald Holzloehner (ESO), experts in laser-atom interactions, led the theoretical interpretation and modeling for the study.

UPDATE : Indonesians Step Up Search For Quake Victims To Beat Deadline As Toll Exceeds 2,000

Rescue workers in Indonesia stepped up their search for victims of an earthquake and tsunami on Tuesday, hoping to find as many bodies as they can before this week’s deadline for their work to halt, as the official death toll rose to 2,010.

The national disaster mitigation agency has called off the search from Thursday, citing concern about the spread of disease. Debris would be cleared and areas where bodies lie would eventually be turned into parks, sports venues and memorials.

Perhaps as many as 5,000 victims of the 7.5 magnitude quake and tsunami on Sept. 28 have yet to be found, most of them entombed in flows of mud flows that surged from the ground when the quake agitated the soil into a liquid mire.

Most of the bodies have been found in the seaside city of Palu, on the west coast of Sulawesi island, 1,500 km (930 miles) northeast of the capital, Jakarta.

More than 10,000 rescue workers are scouring expanses of debris, especially in three areas obliterated by soil liquefaction in the south of the small city.

“We’re not sure what will happen afterwards, so we’re trying to work as fast as possible,” said rescue worker Ahmad Amin, 29, referring to the deadline, as he took a break in the badly hit Balaroa neighborhood.

At least nine excavators were working through the rubble of Balaroa on Tuesday, picking their way through smashed buildings and pummeled vehicles. At least a dozen bodies were recovered, a Reuters photographer said.

“There are so many children still missing, we want to find them quickly,” said Amin, who is from Balaroa and has relatives unaccounted for. “It doesn’t matter if it’s my family or not, the important thing is that we find as many as we can.”

The state disaster mitigation agency said the search was being stepped up and focused more intensely on areas where many people are believed to be buried.

The decision to end the search has angered some relatives of the missing but taxi driver Rudy Rahman, 40, said he had to accept it.

“As long as they keep searching, I will be here every day looking for my son,” said Rahman, who said he had lost three sons in the disaster. The bodies of two were found, the youngest is missing.

“This is the only thing I can do, otherwise I would go insane,” he said, choking back tears. “If they stop, what can I do? There are four meters of soil here. I couldn’t do it on my own.”

‘POLITICAL SENSITIVITIES’
While Indonesian workers searched, the disaster agency ordered independent foreign aid workers to leave the quake zone.

Indonesia has traditionally been reluctant to be seen as relying on outside help to cope with disasters, and the government shunned foreign aid this year when earthquakes struck the island of Lombok.

But it has accepted help from abroad to cope with the Sulawesi disaster.

The disaster agency, in a notice posted on Twitter, set the rules out for foreign non-governmental organizations (NGOs), saying they were not allowed to “go directly to the field” and could only work with “local partners”.

“Foreign citizens who are working with foreign NGOs are not allowed to conduct any activity on the sites,” it said, adding that foreign NGOs with people deployed should withdraw them immediately.

A few foreign aid workers have been in the disaster zone, including a team from the group Pompiers Humanitaires Francais that searched for survivors, but they have spoken of difficulties in getting entry permits and authorization.

“This is the first time we encountered such difficulty in actually getting to do our work,” team leader Arnaud Allibert told Reuters, adding they were leaving on Wednesday as their help was no longer needed.

Indonesian governments are wary of being too open to outside help because they could face criticism from political opponents and there is particular resistance to the presence of foreign military personnel, as it could be seen as an infringement of sovereignty.

“There are political sensitivities, especially with an election coming up, and sovereignty is another issue,” said Keith Loveard, a senior analyst with advisory and risk firm Concord Consulting, referring to polls due next year.

Sulawesi is one of Indonesia’s five main islands. The archipelago sees frequent earthquakes and occasional tsunami.

In 2004, a quake off Sumatra island triggered a tsunami across the Indian Ocean that killed 226,000 people in 13 countries, including more than 120,000 in Indonesia.

Foreign governments and groups played a big role in aid efforts in 2004.

Hurricane Michael Upgraded To Category 2 Storm, Expected To Strengthen Before Florida Landfall

Hurricane Michael strengthened to a Category 2 storm Tuesday morning as it barreled toward Florida’s northeast Gulf Coast, threatening catastrophic storm surge, torrential rain and heavy winds.

“Hurricane Michael is forecast to be the most destructive storm to hit the Florida Panhandle in decades,” Gov. Rick Scott warned on Tuesday.

The storm is expected to move across the eastern Gulf of Mexico through Tuesday and make landfall in the Panhandle on Wednesday afternoon as a Category 3 storm, according to the National Weather Service.

On Tuesday, Michael’s top sustained winds had risen to 100 mph, and the National Hurricane Center said they were expected to increase to at least 110 mph before Michael wallops the Panhandle with “life-threatening” storm surge, heavy rainfall and likely tornados.

Hurricane force winds will extend 40 miles from the center of the storm, the center said.

“Some hurricane force winds are going to go well-inland, said FEMA official Jeff Byard, adding that Florida’s power structure will likely take a greater hit than the Carolinas did during Hurricane Florence.

Scott on Tuesday morning urged residents in the path of the storm to evacuate, saying the effects of the storm would start well before landfall.

“Hurricane Michael is a monstrous storm. The forecast keeps getting more dangerous,” he said.

Scott said he was most worried about the forecasted “absolutely deadly” 8 to 12 feet of storm surge expected, even in noncoastal areas.

“Water will come miles inshore and could easily be over the roofs of houses,” Scott said.

“You cannot hide from storm surge so get prepared and get out if an evacuation is ordered,” he said. “Remember, we can rebuild your house, but we cannot rebuild your life.”

He said 2,500 National Guardsmen are prepared to assist.

On Monday, Scott requested that President Donald Trump declare a pre-landfall emergency for the state, and declared a state of emergency in 35 counties.

Government offices will close in those counties, and while Tuesday was the deadline for Floridians to register to vote, residents will be allowed to register on the day those offices reopen, according to a statement from the secretary of state. The Florida Democratic Party filed a lawsuit Tuesday saying that the one-day extension was insufficient and confusing.

By Friday, the Florida Panhandle and Big Bend, southeast Alabama and southern Georgia could all see 4 to 8 inches of rain, with some areas getting a foot, the NWS said.

Eastern Georgia, the Carolinas and southern Virginia should expect 3 to 6 inches of rain through Friday, and Western Cuba should prepare for 4 to 8 inches, the NWS said.

The Carolinas are only beginning to recover from Hurricane Florence, which left dozens dead and a trail of devastation last month.