New Era of Astronomy Uncovers Clues about Particles and Waves

For most in the history of astronomy, scientists primarily studied signals transmitted by one messenger, electromagnetic radiation. These waves, which move through space and time, are described by their wavelengths or the amount of energy found in their particles.

Radio waves have photons with the lowest amount of energy and the longest wavelengths, followed by infrared and optical light at intermediate energies and wavelengths. X-rays and gamma-rays have the shortest wavelengths and the highest energy.

Multimessenger astronomy is a natural evolution of astronomy. Scientists need more data to put together a complete picture of the objects they study and match the theories they develop with their observations.

Here are the main messengers now being studied:

Cosmic rays: charged particles and nuclei travelling near the speed of light.
Neutrinos: uncharged particles that see most of the universe as transparent.
Gravitational waves: wrinkles in the very fabric of space and time.

While some fields in astronomy have explored these messengers for years, astronomers have only recently observed events from well beyond the Milky Way with more than one messenger at the same time. In just a few months, the number of sources where astronomers can piece together the signals from different messengers doubled.

Astronomers have combined different wavelengths of photons to piece together some of the mysteries of the universe. For example, the combination of radio and optical data played a major role in determining that the Milky Way is a spiral galaxy in 1951.

The cultures of astronomers and particle physicists represent different approaches to science. In multimessenger astronomy, these cultures collide.

Astronomy is an observational field and not an experiment. We study astronomical objects that change over time (time-domain astronomy), which means we often have only one chance to observe a transient astronomical event. Time-domain is the analysis of mathematical functions, physical signals or time series of economic or environmental data, with respect to time.

Until recently, most time-domain astronomers worked in small teams, on many projects at once. We use resources like The Astronomer’s Telegram or the Gamma-ray Coordination Network to rapidly communicate results, even before submitting scientific papers.

Particle physicists have led the way in creating large international collaborations to tackle their hardest problems, including the Large Hadron Collider, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Corralling hundreds to thousands of researchers to work towards common goals requires comprehensive identification of roles, strict communication guidelines and many teleconferences.

The need to respond to rapid changes in a multimessenger source and the huge effort to capture multimessenger signals means astronomy and particle physics must merge towards one another to elicit the best of both cultures.

The benefits of multimessenger astronomy

While multimessenger astronomy is an evolution of what astronomers and particle physicists have done for decades, the combined results are intriguing.

The detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron stars confirmed that these collisions made a large fraction of the gold and platinum on Earth (and throughout the universe). It also showed how these collisions give rise to (at least some) short gamma-ray bursts—the origin of these explosive events has been a huge open question in astronomy.

The first association of a neutrino with a single astronomical source provided a glimpse into how the universe makes its most energetic particles. Multimessenger astronomy is revealing details about some of the most extreme conditions in our universe.

The multimessenger perspective is already yielding more than the sum of its parts —and we can expect to see more surprising discoveries in the future. Elite teams are already contributing to the growth of this young field, and multimessenger astronomy promises to play a major role in our next decade of astronomical research across the world.

Part II – Lunar and Solar Eclipse and Related Earth Changing Events

First, thank you for your well wishes, and a pleasant surprise from some who responded to my addressing the love I have for my work and in ways reflects that of my marriage and family.

“I think you know I love what I do, but what’s really rewarding is when it loves me back. I attribute my thoughts to that of a healthy marriage. To give a hundred percent is a good thing, but many of us who are married, add a bit more if you have kids, realize that sometimes a hundred percent is not enough. This is to say; even on those times when you are absolutely right on this, that, or the other, it’s better to let your partner be right too.”

This was written without conscience, which ironically, defines its literal meaning. This gives me hope that just maybe my inside matches my outside. So it really touched me to see your response, and I’m guessing it must have touched a part of you, or at least caused you to pause if only for a second or minute. If those of you who commented bringing your thoughts to my attention, I would not have noticed any such possible deeper understanding. Thanks

But to maintain full disclosure…I do not always measure up to this worthy principle mentioned above. Nonetheless, I do hold it as an ideal, trying at most turns to maintain it as my default. Oh, and btw, the piggy bank is still pretty empty. Go to the following link to help keep us alive: CLICK HERE

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Okay, now let’s get to the science of things:

You will see a list of significant earthquakes following below. But first, let me highlight the ’cause’ of events as it relates to both Lunar and Solar eclipse. My research points to a 14 day prior and 14 day post window lunar or solar events.

As it relates to a lunar eclipse, the stimulant which precipitates events such as earthquakes and volcanoes is the ‘fluid displacement’ initiated by gravitational tugs causing unusual high tides placing additional weight (pressure) on tectonic plates causing slippage.

The term fluid displacement is not just related to oceans; it includes fluids such as magma, oil, liquefied sediment, and even gas processes. It is the expansion [or contraction] of fluids on tectonic plates which cause the increase of larger earthquakes or volcanic eruptions.

As it relates to solar eclipse, it is the sudden temperature fluctuation which can cause a chain reaction. By presenting a sudden and rapid shift in both the jet stream and ocean currents, this in-turn can cause a destabilizing of set seasonal patterns. Although temperature flux may be subtle, if tectonics are at their tipping point, it would not take much to set them off. Additionally, the rapid temperature change can cause an expansion and contraction of Earth’s lithosphere, even if ever so slight, can set off a chain reaction of tectonic slippage resulting in significant earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Remember, the majority of volcanoes are submarine (ocean bottom); hence the rapid shift in ocean temperatures is also prone to set off a rippling effect which is often unpredictable due to the spider webbing tentacles which connect a system of mantle plumes and volcanoes.

Significant Earthquakes Between JULY 15TH – AUGUST 19TH

2018-08-19  T15:16:34.100Z  5.9  8km ESE of Sembalunbumbung, Indonesia

2018-08-19  T14:56:28.090Z  6.9  2km S of Belanting, Indonesia

2018-08-19  T04:28:59.760Z  6.8  282km ESE of Lambasa, Fiji

2018-08-19  T04:10:21.570Z  6.3  6km NE of Sembalunlawang, Indonesia

2018-08-19  T00:23:02.740Z  6.3  259km NNE of Ndoi Island, Fiji

2018-08-19  T00:19:37.970Z  8.2  280km NNE of Ndoi Island, Fiji

2018-08-17  T23:22:24.900Z  6.1  14km N of Golfito, Costa Rica

2018-08-17  T15:35:02.070Z  6.5  109km NNW of Kampungbajo, Indonesia

2018-08-16  T18:22:53.350Z  6.3  250km SE of Iwo Jima, Japan

2018-08-15  T21:56:54.780Z  6.6  50km S of Tanaga Volcano, Alaska

2018-08-14  T03:29:53.440Z  6.1  126km NE of Bristol Island, South Sandwich Islands

2018-08-12  T21:15:01.841Z  6.1  65km SSW of Kaktovik, Alaska

2018-08-12  T14:58:54.286Z  6.3  90km SW of Kaktovik, Alaska

2018-08-10  T18:12:06.880Z  5.9  267km SSW of Severo-Kuril’sk, Russia

2018-08-09  T05:25:31.910Z  5.9  3km SE of Todo, Indonesia

2018-08-05  T11:46:38.190Z  6.9  0km SW of Loloan, Indonesia

2018-07-28  T22:47:38.740Z  6.4  5km WNW of Obelobel, Indonesia

2018-07-28  T17:07:23.370Z 6.0    149km N of Palue, Indonesia

2018-07-23  T10:36:00.330Z 5.9  Central Mid-Atlantic Ridge

2018-07-21  T20:56:19.940Z  5.9  Southeast Indian Ridge

2018-07-19  T18:30:32.710Z  6.0  91km W of Kandrian, Papua New Guinea

2018-07-17  T07:02:53.020Z  6.0  116km SE of Lata, Solomon Islands

2018-07-15  T13:09:16.470Z  6.0  159km SSE of Sayhut, Yemen

2018-07-15  T01:57:19.410Z  6.0  137km SSE of Sayhut, Yemen

Part III – identifies the latest in cosmic ray discoveries and its effect on our galaxy-solar system-Sun-Earth. There will be many surprises.

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I Am Excited to be Back; and For More Than One Reason

Hello ‘Science Of Cycles’ patrons. I’m coming off a surgery to remove a large tumor from my upper leg. What would have been a mostly unenthusiastic surgery, took a turn with a false-positive biopsy. As you have probably surmised, the final result is a benign and known as Lipoma. However, not all Lipoma’s are the same. They usually do not exhibit pain, of course mine did; and they usually grow at a very slow pace, mine seem to be in a hurry.

It appears the lump was entangled in muscle which was the cause of pain. As for the apparent faster than usual growth, it seems to have something to do with muscle entanglement. So to end this somewhat morbid explanation to my absence of articles, I am now resting reasonable well – and most importantly, able to return to my research and of bringing you the latest cutting edge news in the fields of Earth Science, Space Weather, and AstroPhysics which in fact affirms almost on a daily basis, the defining a symbiotic connection with our galaxy and universe. To date, the element which connects our little home to the seemingly vast universe is ‘charged particles’.

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Piggy Bank is empty…need your support as always to keep this machine running. I think you know I love what I do, but what’s really rewarding is when it loves me back. I attribute my thoughts to that of a healthy marriage. To give a hundred percent is a good thing, but many of us who are married, add a bit more if you have kids, have realized that sometimes a hundred percent is not enough. This is to say, even on those times you are absolutely right, it’s better to let your partner be right too.

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As we gain increased knowledge of the when-where-how of various charged particles, which encompasses such things as Black Holes, Supernovas, Gamma Ray Blasts, and Coronal Mass Ejections – we develop a cognizance lending itself to a measure of predictability. As a naturally directed outcome of evolving research – it is the “Science Of Cycles” which takes us to the next level of aptitude which could very well bring us to the cusp of an extraterrestrial neighborhood.

ps, I should mention one of the shortcomings of my healing process, is a curtailed period on the keyboard. Hence, moving on, and expect a Part II and most likely a Part III to this and coming articles.

There has been a whirlwind of activity over the last few weeks. The July 27th 2018 total lunar eclipse was visible in large parts of Australia, Asia, Africa, Europe, and South America. Totality lasted for 103 minutes, making it the longest eclipse of the 21st century. Then, on August 11th a partial solar eclipse was visible from northern and Eastern Europe, northern parts of North America, and some northern and western locations in Asia, making it the most watched solar eclipse of 2018.

In Part II of this article, I will cover the 14 day prior and 14 day post events of July 27th total Lunar Eclipse, and the August 11th Partial Solar Eclipse – both of which my research has been able to identify a connection to significant earth changing events during these windows of opportunity. Events such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and extreme weather are among those which I will outline. Some outcomes are related to gravity, others with rapid temperature flux, and yet others with fluid displacement.

In Part III will encompass the incredible discoveries as it relates to Cosmic Rays, one of which is the identification of a ultra-high-energy cosmic ray, now labeled as the “OMG Particle”. Also, new information indicating a 30% increase of cosmic rays entering Earth’s atmosphere.

I hope this article refreshes your memory and enthusiasm that you can only find right here at ‘Science Of Cycles’ research and news service.

Stay Tuned…………

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Using The K Computer, Scientists Predict Exotic “Di-Omega” Particle

Based on complex simulations of quantum chromodynamics performed using the K computer, one of the most powerful computers in the world, the HAL QCD Collaboration, made up of scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science and the RIKEN Interdisciplinary Theoretical and Mathematical Sciences (iTHEMS) program, together with colleagues from a number of universities, have predicted a new type of “dibaryon”—a particle that contains six quarks instead of the usual three. Studying how these elements form could help scientists understand the interactions among elementary particles in extreme environments such as the interiors of neutron stars or the early universe moments after the Big Bang.

Particles known as “baryons”—principally protons and neutrons—are composed of three quarks bound tightly together, with their charge depending on the “color” of the quarks that make them up. A dibaryon is essentially a system with two baryons. There is one known dibaryon in nature—deuteron, a deuterium (or heavy-hydrogen) nucleus that contains a proton and a neutron that are very lightly bound. Scientists have long wondered whether there could be other types of dibaryons. Despite searches, no other dibaryon has been found.

The group, in work published in Physical Review Letters, has now used powerful theoretical and computational tools to predict the existence of a “most strange” dibaryon, made up of two “Omega baryons” that contain three strange quarks each. They named it “di-Omega”. The group also suggested a way to look for these strange particles through experiments with heavy ion collisions planned in Europe and Japan.

The finding was made possible by a fortuitous combination of three elements: better methods for making QCD calculations, better simulation algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers.

The first essential element was a new theoretical framework called the “time-dependent HAL QCD method”: It allows researchers to extract the force acting between baryons from the large volume of numerical data obtained using the K computer.

The second element was a new computational method, the unified contraction algorithm, which allows much more efficient calculation of a system with a large number of quarks.

The third element was the advent of powerful supercomputers. According to Shinya Gongyo from the RIKEN Nishina Center, “We were very lucky to have been able to use the K computer to perform the calculations. It allowed fast calculations with a huge number of variables. Still, it took almost three years for us to reach our conclusion on the di-Omega.”

Discussing the future, Tetsuo Hatsuda from RIKEN iTHEMS says, “We believe that these special particles could be generated by the experiments using heavy ion collisions that are planned in Europe and in Japan, and we look forward to working with colleagues there to experimentally discover the first dibaryon system outside of deuteron. This work could give us hints for understanding the interaction among strange baryons (called hyperons) and to understand how, under extreme conditions like those found in neutron stars, normal matter can transition to what is called hyperonic matter—made up of protons, neutrons, and strange-quark particles called hyperons, and eventually to quark matter composed of up, down and strange quarks.”

Stellar Magnetism: What’s Behind The Most Brilliant Lights In The Sky?

Space physicists at University of Wisconsin-Madison have just released unprecedented detail on a bizarre phenomenon that powers the northern lights, solar flares and coronal mass ejections (the biggest explosions in our solar system).

The data on so-called “magnetic reconnection” came from a quartet of new spacecraft that measure radiation and magnetic fields in high Earth orbit.

“We’re looking at the best picture yet of magnetic reconnection in space,” says Jan Egedal, a professor of physics and senior author of a study in Physical Review Letters. Magnetic reconnection is difficult to describe, but it can be loosely defined as the merger of magnetic fields that releases an astonishing amount of energy.

Magnetic reconnection remains mysterious, especially since it “breaks the standard law” governing charged particles, or plasma, Egedal says.

Egedal and colleagues studied recordings from Oct. 15, 2016, when the Magnetosphere Multiscale satellite passed through the point where the solar wind meets Earth’s magnetic field. “Our data clearly show that electrons suddenly cease to follow magnetic fields and zoom off in another direction, corkscrewing and turning. That begs for explanation,” Egedal says.

The activity confirmed the theoretical descriptions of magnetic reconnection. But it violated the standard law governing the behavior of plasmas — clouds of charged particles that comprise, for example, the solar wind. “The ‘plasma frozen-in law’ says electrons and magnetic fields have to move together always, and suddenly that does not apply here,” says Egedal. “It’s the clearest example ever to be measured in space, and it blew my mind.”

“Our equations tell you reconnection cannot happen, but it does,” Egedal says, “and our results show us which factors need to be added to the equations. When the law is violated, we can get an explosion. Even in Earth’s moderate magnetic field, reconnection from an area just 10 kilometers across can change the motion of plasma thousands of kilometers distant.”

In the 1970s, telescopes orbiting above earth’s sheltering magnetic field and atmosphere began returning data on X-rays and other non-visible types of radiation. Rather quickly, the age-old image of the sky as a quiet curtain of stars was yanked aside, revealing a zoo of weird objects, powerful beams and cataclysmic explosions.

All of them needed to be explained, and theorists began to focus on magnetic reconnection, which had been sketched out in 1956. By now, magnetic reconnection has been linked to: Black holes, ultra-dense objects with intense gravity that prohibits even light from leaving.Pulsars, which rotate hundreds of times a second and emit piercing beacons of light.Supernovas, which release energy visible across the galaxies when they explode. Active galactic nuclei, super-bright candles that are visible from billions of light years distance.

“Almost everything we know about the universe comes from the light that reaches us,” says Cary Forest, also a professor of physics at UW-Madison. “When one of these fantastic space telescopes sees a massive burst of X-rays that lasts just tens of milliseconds coming from an object in a galaxy far away, this giant burst of energy at such a great distance may reflect a massive reconnection event.”

But there’s more, Forest adds. “When neutron stars merge and give off X-rays, that’s magnetic reconnection. With these advanced orbiting telescopes, just about everything that’s interesting, that goes off suddenly, probably has some major reconnection element at its root.”

Magnetic reconnection also underlies the auroras at both poles, Egedal says. When reconnection occurs on the sunward side of Earth, as was seen in the recent study, “it changes the magnetic energy in the system. This energy migrates to the night side, and the same thing happens there, accelerating particles to the poles, forming auroras.”

Beyond offering insight into the role of magnetic reconnection in celestial explosions, eruptions and extraordinary emissions of energy, the observations have a practical side in terms of space weather: explosions of charged matter from the sun can damage satellites and even electrical equipment on the ground. After a solar flare in 1989, for example, the entire power system in Quebec went dark after it picked up a pulse of energy from space. “Across the United States from coast to coast, over 200 power grid problems erupted within minutes of the start of the March 13 magnetic storm,” NASA wrote.

Today, Forest notes, modern utility systems contain switches to interrupt the loop of conductors that could become antennas that pick up a problematic pulse from the sun.

“If we understand reconnection better, perhaps we can improve space weather forecasts,” says Egedal. “We can look at the sun to predict what may happen in two to four days, which is how long the wind from the sun takes to reach Earth.”

-The work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) GEM award 1405166 and NASA grant NNX14AL38G. Simulations used NASA HEC and LANL IC resources.

The Missing Link Between Exploding Stars, Clouds, And Climate On Earth

The study reveals how atmospheric ions, produced by the energetic cosmic rays raining down through the atmosphere, helps the growth and formation of cloud condensation nuclei — the seeds necessary for forming clouds in the atmosphere. When the ionization in the atmosphere changes, the number of cloud condensation nuclei changes affecting the properties of clouds. More cloud condensation nuclei mean more clouds and a colder climate, and vice versa. Since clouds are essential for the amount of Solar energy reaching the surface of Earth the implications can be significant for our understanding of why climate has varied in the past and also for future climate changes.

Cloud condensation nuclei can be formed by the growth of small molecular clusters called aerosols. It has until now been assumed that additional small aerosols would not grow and become cloud condensation nuclei, since no mechanism was known to achieve this. The new results reveal, both theoretically and experimentally, how interactions between ions and aerosols can accelerate the growth by adding material to the small aerosols and thereby help them survive to become cloud condensation nuclei. It gives a physical foundation to the large body of empirical evidence showing that Solar activity plays a role in variations in Earth’s climate. For example, the Medieval Warm Period around year 1000 AD and the cold period in the Little Ice Age 1300-1900 AD both fits with changes in Solar activity.

“Finally we have the last piece of the puzzle explaining how particles from space affect climate on Earth. It gives an understanding of how changes caused by Solar activity or by super nova activity can change climate.” says Henrik Svensmark, from DTU Space at the Technical University of Denmark, lead author of the study. Co-authors are senior researcher Martin Bødker Enghoff (DTU Space), Professor Nir Shaviv (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), and Jacob Svensmark, (University of Copenhagen).

The new study

The fundamental new idea in the study is to include a contribution to growth of aerosols by the mass of the ions. Although the ions are not the most numerous constituents in the atmosphere the electro-magnetic interactions between ions and aerosols compensate for the scarcity and make fusion between ions and aerosols much more likely. Even at low ionization levels about 5% of the growth rate of aerosols is due to ions. In the case of a nearby super nova the effect can be more than 50% of the growth rate, which will have an impact on the clouds and the Earth’s temperature.

To achieve the results a theoretical description of the interactions between ions and aerosols was formulated along with an expression for the growth rate of the aerosols. The ideas were then tested experimentally in a large cloud chamber. Due to experimental constraints caused by the presence of chamber walls, the change in growth rate that had to be measured was of the order 1%, which poses a high demand on stability during the experiments, and experiments were repeated up to 100 times in order to obtain a good signal relative to unwanted fluctuations. Data was taken over a period of 2 years with total 3100 hours of data sampling. The results of the experiments agreed with the theoretical predictions.

The hypothesis in a nutshell

Cosmic rays, high-energy particles raining down from exploded stars, knock electrons out of air molecules. This produces ions, that is, positive and negative molecules in the atmosphere.

The ions help aerosols — clusters of mainly sulphuric acid and water molecules — to form and become stable against evaporation. This process is called nucleation. The small aerosols need to grow nearly a million times in mass in order to have an effect on clouds.

The second role of ions is that they accelerate the growth of the small aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei — seeds on which liquid water droplets form to make clouds. The more ions the more aerosols become cloud condensation nuclei. It is this second property of ions which is the new result published in Nature Communications.

Low clouds made with liquid water droplets cool the Earth’s surface.

Variations in the Sun’s magnetic activity alter the influx of cosmic rays to the Earth.

When the Sun is lazy, magnetically speaking, there are more cosmic rays and more low clouds, and the world is cooler.

When the Sun is active fewer cosmic rays reach the Earth and, with fewer low clouds, the world warms up.

The implications of the study suggests that the mechanism can have affected:

The climate changes observed during the 20th century

The coolings and warmings of around 2oC that have occurred repeatedly over the past 10,000 years, as the Sun’s activity and the cosmic ray influx have varied.

The much larger variations of up to 10oC occuring as the Sun and Earth travel through the Galaxy visiting regions with varying numbers of exploding stars.

NEW: The Highest-Energy Cosmic Rays Originate From Unknown Galaxies

Where do cosmic rays come from? Solving a 50-year old mystery, a collaboration of researchers has discovered it is much farther than the Milky Way.

In an paper published in the scientific journal ‘Science’, the Pierre Auger Collaboration has definitively answered the question of whether cosmic particles had originated from outside the Milky Way Galaxy. Their research notes that studying the distribution of the cosmic ray arrival directions is the first step in determining where the extragalactic particles originate.

The collaborating scientists were able to make their recordings using the largest cosmic ray observatory ever built, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Included in this collaboration are David Nitz and Brian Fick, professors of physics at Michigan Technological University.

“We are now considerably closer to solving the mystery of where and how these extraordinary particles are created, a question of great interest to astrophysicists,” says Karl-Heinz Kampert, a professor at the University of Wuppertal in Germany and spokesperson for the Auger Collaboration, which involves more than 400 scientists from 18 countries.

Cosmic rays are the nuclei of elements from hydrogen to iron. Studying them gives scientists a way to study matter from outside our solar system – and now, outside our galaxy. Cosmic rays help us understand the composition of galaxies and the processes that occur to accelerate the nuclei to nearly the speed of light. By studying cosmic rays, scientists may come to understand what mechanisms create the nuclei.

To put it simply, understanding cosmic rays and where they originate can help us answer fundamental questions about the origins of the universe, our galaxy and ourselves.

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Be a part of Science Of Cycles Multi-Disaster Relief Initiative. Lets come together and help those who need a helping hand. Notice I did not specify a hurricane name, why? Because there is more than Harvey and Irma heading our way. The banner is set up for you to be able to place any amount you wish.   Cheers, Mitch