Tropical Storm Newton Makes Second Landfall in Mexico, Threatens U.S. With Rain

Hurricane Newton weakened to a tropical storm as it made its second landfall in Mexico early Wednesday, but forecasters warned it would dump dangerous amounts of rain on the U.S. later in the day.

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The storm faded after unleashing 90-mph winds and heavy rains on the tourist resorts of Los Cabos on Tuesday.

Hurricane Newton weakened to a tropical storm as it made its second landfall in Mexico early Wednesday, but forecasters warned it would dump dangerous amounts of rain on the U.S. later in the day.

The storm faded after unleashing 90-mph winds and heavy rains on the tourist resorts of Los Cabos on Tuesday.

By 8 a.m. ET, Mexico’s government had discontinued all coastal watches and warnings for the storm, which was located about 55 miles northwest of Hermosillo, Mexico, and about 180 miles south-southwest of Tucson, Arizona.

Newton’s maximum sustained winds were 60 mph, the National Hurricane Center said in its 8 a.m. advisory. It was moving north at 18 mph.

On Tuesday, Newton smashed windows, felled trees and sparked widespread power outages. Tourists huddled in hotels and locals sheltered in their homes as the storm churned over the Baja California peninsula.

Two people died and three were missing after their shrimp boat capsized in rough seas generated by the hurricane in Mexico’s Gulf of California, according to The Associated Press.

Although it packed a punch, Newton did not bring the same level of destruction to Los Cabos as Hurricane Odile, which devastated parts of the luxury resort region in Sept. 2014.

After crossing the Gulf, the storm made its second landfall on mainland Mexico at around 3 a.m. local time (6 a.m. ET) while packing winds of 70 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Rainfall of up to 12 inches was expected to spark “life-threatening flash floods and mudslides,” especially in coastal areas, according to the Weather Channel.

The storm was set to cross the U.S. border into Arizona around nine hours later.

If Newton keeps its tropical-storm strength all the way to Arizona, it will be only the sixth storm to do so on record, according to Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore.

The National Weather Service has issued flash-flood watches across southern Arizona, New Mexico, and far western Texas. It warned the storm would bring “showers capable of producing heavy rain and in turn causing flash flooding,” with some regions getting as much as five inches during the downpour.

Author: Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.